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domingo, 31 de março de 2013

What's the difference between because and because of? (Podcast)



Hi Taka! You're right to say that the grammar was slightly different, although the meaning was the same.
Hina couldn't go out because she was ill. 
Hina said because in the first one, and because of in the second one.
So, what's the difference between because and because of? 


Well, because is a conjunction.
That means it must be followed by a subject and verb. Listen to Hina:

Hina: I couldn't go out because I had a cold.

Did you hear the subject and verb after because? 
She said 'I had a cold'. Listen again:

Hina: I couldn't go out because I had a cold.

Now because of isn't a conjunction, it’s a preposition
That means it must be followed by a noun phrase, not a verb phrase. 
Here's Hina again:

Hina: I couldn't go out because of my cold.
Did you catch the noun phrase? Hina said 'my cold'. Listen again:

Hina: I couldn't go out because of my cold.

You could also use a gerund – that's an verb plus 'ing' -after because of – so Hina could say:

Hina: I couldn't go out because of having a cold.

A verb with –ing often functions as a noun – so you use it after because of.

So that's because with a verb phrase, and because of with a noun phrase or a gerund.

Ok, that's all from me. Good luck with your grammar challenge!


Um comentário:

  1. So that's because with a verb phrase, and because of with a noun phrase or a gerund.

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